The International Network on Offshore Renewable Energy (INORE) is an association of postgraduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and other professionals at early stages of their careers, working in the fields of offshore wind, wave, tidal and ocean thermal energy conversion. We call ourselves INOREans. INORE’s organization, administration, fundraising, etc. is done through the voluntary hard-work of dedicated INOREans elected by their peers to the steering committee.

INORE was founded by a small group of researchers in 2006 in order to solve problems through interdisciplinary collaboration. Today, INORE has more than 1000 members from over 70 countries, representing a network that spans a multitude of research fields, including technological, social, economic and environmental aspects. We carry the torch of our founders in our official mission: “the advancement of education and the proliferation of public knowledge in relation to Offshore Renewable Energy.”

The INORE Symposium is truly the heart of INORE. It is where it all started and it is the event that makes INORE what it is today – an organization successfully implementing its mission and beloved by its members. The Symposium is a free, action-packed, week-long, intimate, and informal conference of about 60-70 early-stage researchers. In many ways, it’s like a typical conference: presentations, poster sessions, tutorials, and keynote speakers. But we also have activities geared towards building the bonds of collaboration.

Collaborative tasks are mini group projects that participants work on over the course of the week and report on at its end. They are often designed with the help of one of INORE’s partners, such as companies, research institutes or government agencies and address real-world problems, providing a context for research and a broader understanding.

Social and recreational group activities are also one of our keys to quickly forming close working relationships. At the 2013 Symposium in Wales, canoeing, kayaking, raft-building, or coasteering were on offer. I chose coasteering without really knowing what was. (It’s like mountaineering or canyoneering, but on the coast.) With people that I had known for a day, I shared a lot of laughs, shivers, and a few screams; all of which really accelerated the “getting-to-know-you” process.

 

INORE is a non-profit organisation run by volunteers.  INORE was created as a network to support early-stage researchers of offshore renewable energy within an international context.  With over 1200 members from over 75 countries around the world, INORE aims to facilitate networking and knowledge transfer between young researchers. The organisation currently focuses on four main fields of knowledge: wave, tidal, offshore wind and OTEC.

“INORE’s mission is to bring together early-stage researchers (INOREans) from around the world and with a variety of backgrounds to share what they know, and learn from others working in offshore renewable energy.  We do this by running activities that are for INOREans, designed by INOREAns, in a fun, welcoming and casual environment where your peers become your friends.”

In order to achieve its mission, INORE brings together an international and multi-disciplinary group of young researchers who are passionate about developing offshore renewable energy, booking the knowledge of early-stage researchers by helping them to meet and collaborate, independent of their experience, discipline or nationality.

Depositphotos_55068411_originalINORE also proactively links early-stage researchers with relevant stakeholders (e.g. academia, supply chain, developers, etc.) in the field of Offshore Renewable Energy (ORE) in order to extend links between parties to ensure a greater knowledge sharing community.

INORE’s vision is a world where INOREans have helped to shape ORE into the global energy mix, and where we continue to unite INOREans and inspire and empower them to do great research and follow their career dreams.

We are supported by our generous sponsors who share our vision to advance education and spread public knowledge of offshore renewable energy.

 

 

It all started in Norway…
INORE was founded in 2006, in Norway, by a group of PhD students from different European countries. Its initial purpose was to provide a forum on which young professionals and researchers working in the field of offshore renewable energy could gather and openly exchange their knowledge, experiences and ideas.INORE's First Steering Committee 2006

The idea of creating a network for young researchers who worked on offshore renewable energy was born in the “PhD Pool on Offshore Renewable Energy” existing of one Post Doc and three PhD students associated to the Norwegian Centre For Renewable Energy and financed by the Research Council of Norway.

 

The intention with the PhD Pool was to let researchers from different fields work together in order to create solutions which are difficult to achieve without the touch of interdisciplinary thinking. The PhD pool soon realised that the need for a bigger community to enable the discussions needed to obtain this goal. Inspired by the blooming industry and lack of real cooperation across country boarders the work to establish an interdisciplinary and international network was started.

One of the key ideas was to establish a truly international network. To ensure the international spirit an interim committee meeting with participants from four different countries was held near Trondheim 15-17th of April 2007. The meeting was attended by the three initiators from Norway and three new committee members who were selected after applications.

The objectives of the meeting were to establish targets, strategies and visions for the network. New committee members from three different countries with different background and knowledge were invited in order to make the network truly international from inception and to assure commitment in several countries from inception.

Eight years on, INORE has over 1,200 members from 75 countries of which more than 530 are

Associate members, known as INOREans. To achieve its objectives, INORE has been able to position itself thanks to a series of knowledge-sharing tools such as symposia, workshops, technological challenges, scholarships and via its own web page.

The picture above shows the interim steering committee on a site visit at the island Frøya outside Trondheim, Norway (names according to position in the picture); Nicolai Løvdal, Jørgen Hals and Marta Molinas from Norway and , Helen Bailey from UK, Miguel Lopes from Portugal and Cristina Huertas-Olivares from Spain.

 

We’re all about the knowledge transfer and generally promoting collaborative research for the betterment of  offshore renewables, and we’re run by volunteers which is pretty cool. Learn about our governance in the document below.

Memorandum and Articles of Association

In February 2014 we decided to move our headquarters to UK (Plymouth) and approved a constitution, giving to INORE a formal status which we didn’t got before. Then, in February 2015 we became incorporated as a Limited by Guarantee Company with limited objects (i.e., A non-for-profit company which main aim is to became a charity in the mid-term).

There is no real network without activities and communication. INORE creates opportunities for informal arenas to better see the possibilities and challenges that lie ahead through discussion, evaluation and dissemination.

Thus, through cross-pollination, early stage researchers and their research contribution becomes greater than the sum of their parts. INORE operate on three time-scales:

Continuously – www.inore.org (All the time – 24/7/365)

On this website every early stage researcher working on issues related to offshore renewable energy may register to become a member – an INOREan. This website is our primary communication tool. The website is fully driven by the members who all have the opportunity to add news, events,  jobs, update their profile, contribute on the forums, upload documents to the library and pics to the galleries. INORE want to communicate with the world at large, therefore anybody can register as user of the INORE website. Registered users may receive news, discuss on the forum, comment on news and update their profile. Ph.D’s can become INOREans with extended privileges.

Technology Challenges (1-2 times/year – 1 day)

When possible INORE runs Technology Breakthrough Challenges. For example, in June 2011, 25 international young researchers participated in the floating wind turbine challenge, organized with the help of the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN. At this event, seven teams developed a floating structure for a 1/100 scale wind turbine in only 24 hours, which were then tested in MARIN’s Shallow Water Basin.

Annually – Symposium (1 time/year – 3-4 days)

INORE’s main arena is the annual symposium. The INORE Symposium is an international event for early stage researchers to discuss their work and learn through each other’s experience. This event helps the launch of future sustainable collaborative research between the different participants. The Symposium is not only an academic arena. In order to facilitate networking and learning, the symposium also includes social activities and inspiring sessions with keynote speakers Industry leaders, leading researchers or government representatives.

Frequently – Workshops (1-2 times/year – 1 day)

Our workshops are typically held in connection to an established conference with relevance for either offshore wind, wave or tidal energy. These arrangements are open for all young people (early stage in your career) as long as you are, or are about to, work on issues related to offshore renewable energy. The workshop normally consists of a discussion between key note panellists (experts from the field) and young researchers. This arena also facilitates the networking between senior experts in the field and young professionals. This is the arena where prospective research candidates can meet other young researchers to get a feeling of how (good) the life of a researcher could be. This is also the arena where young people from the industry can join and build a network with early stage researchers. For instance, at the 2013 European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference in Aalborg, Denmark over 100 early stage researchers attended the INORE workshop, which consisted of an expert panel session, group discussions, and concluded with an evening of fun, food and drinks at a local restaurant.

Frequently – Workshops (1-2 times/year – 1 day)

Our workshops are typically held in connection to an established conference with relevance for either offshore wind, wave or tidal energy. These arrangements are open for all young people (early stage in your career) as long as you are, or are about to, work on issues related to offshore renewable energy. The workshop normally consists of a discussion between key note panellists (experts from the field) and young researchers. This arena also facilitates the networking between senior experts in the field and young professionals. This is the arena where prospective research candidates can meet other young researchers to get a feeling of how (good) the life of a researcher could be. This is also the arena where young people from the industry can join and build a network with early stage researchers.

Become an INOREan

Become a member of INORE and help us to realize the power of offshore energy

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Become a Sponsor

INORE represents an opportunity to expose your company to current high-level academic research, and provides a forum for aligning academic work with your needs. Involvement with INORE will also improve your access to and ability to recruit future professionals from the pool of offshore renewable energy’s top minds.

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Browse Members

Committee Members

Hanna Torrens-Spence

Hanna Torrens-Spence

Chair

[email protected]
Hanna is a PhD student at Queen’s University Belfast. Her work focuses on characterising high velocity tidal flows. She loves to travel to warmer climes for a conference or five, or for any excuse, really. Along with other members of the Marine Research Group she competes very seriously in Tag Rugby at All-Ireland level… for beginners. Go SPACE Cadets!

Francois-Xavier Fay

Francois-Xavier Fay

Web Manager

[email protected]
FX joined the Marine Energy area in Tecnalia as a PhD student with the University of the Basque Country in Spain. His work focuses on power take-off systems in wave energy and especially in oscillating water column systems. After discovering he was the hidden brother of the Sochi’s gold medal half-pipe snowboarder, he decided to go hunting mushrooms in the Urdaibai natural reserve.

Boris Teillant

Boris Teillant

Sponsorship Coordinator

[email protected]
Boris is a research engineer at WavEC Offshore Renewables, in Portugal. His main research activities involve techno-economic analysis of innovative concepts for wave energy converters and lifecycle logistics of ocean energy arrays. While not awake, Boris is also secretly working on a visionary sailing boat design featuring both a pool table and a bar.

Aisha McKee

Aisha McKee

Event Coordinator – US Symposium

Aisha is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at Oregon State University. Her current research revolves around building, modelling, and controlling oscillating water column WECs. In her free time, she enjoys baking, crafting, and hanging out with her cat, so basically your average domestic goddess. 

Caity Clark

Caity Clark

Vice Chair

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Caity is a graduate student in the Northwest National Renewable Energy Center and Design Engineering Lab at Oregon State University. Her research focuses on the optimization of combined technology offshore renewable energy sites and devices. Caity is an avid runner, and enjoys backpacking, whitewater sports, and snowshoeing. 

Chris Sharp

Chris Sharp

Web Manager

[email protected]
Chris Sharp is a PhD candidate at Oregon State University working with MIME’s Design Engineering Lab and the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center. His Research at OSU focuses on developing optimization algorithms for arrays of wave energy converters. When not optimizing arrays, Chris enjoys backpacking, bouldering, mountain biking, tea and generally just being outside.

Fernando del Jesus

Fernando del Jesus

Research Manager

[email protected]
Fernando is a PhD Student at the Environmental Hydraulics Institute of Cantabria (IH Cantabria). He is developing his research in the Ocean Energy and Offshore Engineering group. His work focuses on the improvement of the offshore wind design methodology, from the wind resource assessment to the floating platform characterization. He really likes teamwork, not only at work but also at sports, music and science fiction.

Alex Simpson

Alex Simpson

Event Coordinator – US Symposium

Alex is a PhD student at Oregon State University in Coastal & Ocean Engineering. Her research interests include wave forecasting for controls applications, and remote sensing using X-Band marine radar. She spends her free time on a mountain bike, carrying a heavy backpack, or falling off her surfboard.

Susan Tully

Susan Tully

Finance Manager

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Susan is a PhD student in the Institute for Energy Systems at Edinburgh University predominantly working on the effects of turbulence on tidal turbine blades. When not working, or creating Microsoft Paint masterpieces, she enjoys hill walking, cycling and laughing in inappropriate situations. She is also the Durness welly boot throwing champion of 2008.

Loup Suja-Thauvin

Loup Suja-Thauvin

Event Coordinator

[email protected]
Loup is working on a PhD in hydrodynamics at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, in Trondheim, and his research focuses on bottom-fixed offshore wind turbines in extreme storm conditions. He enjoys climbing, hiking and generally any type of outdoorsy activity, especially when they can be combined with a guitar and a beer. He loves freezing his butt off in tiny wooden huts with no water nor electricity in the deepest wilderness of Norway.

Nicolás Tomey-Bozo

Nicolás Tomey-Bozo

Event Coordinator – European Symposium

Nicolas is a PhD student at the MaREI Centre from University College Cork, in Ireland. He works on the hydrodynamics of co-located arrays of wave energy converters and offshore wind turbines. When you don’t know where to find him, he is probably hidden in the forest playing with the leprechauns.

Anke Bender

Anke Bender

In December 2015 I started my PhD at Uppsala University in Sweden. My work focuses on behavior and population effects on fish and crustaceans, in relation to wave power. I hope that I can expand INORE a bit more with other biologists or people working with environmental issues related to renewables. In my free time I like to travel, diving and all other kinds of water activities.

Advisory Committee Members

Samantha Quinn

Samantha Quinn

[email protected]
Samantha is the Operations Manager at the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center at Oregon State University. Although she now focuses on making sure everything is running smoothly, she continues to dabble in research focused on  policy, innovation and economics for offshore renewable energy. She is terrified of swimming in the sea and has been stung twice by jellyfish. Also, she love bridges.

Michele Martini

Michele Martini

[email protected]
Michele is a Researcher in the Offshore Engineering Group at IH Cantabria, in Spain. He is focusing his work on the effects that met-ocean conditions have on floating wind and wave energy farms in terms of energy production, long-term response and O&M activities. He loves watching storms from lighthouses – as long as they are not too close to the sea.

Carlos Perez Collazo

Carlos Perez Collazo

[email protected]
Carlos is a Research Fellow in  Wave and Offshore Wind Energy at the University of Plymouth. He works closely with  the Partnership for Research In Marine Renewable Energy (PRIMaRE) – the research cluster in Marine Renewable Energy for the South of England. His research is focused on the development of new solutions for wave and offshore wind energy sectors and on how to combine them. He loves traveling and discover new cultures and places.